Sims 4 Snowy Escape: Build your own Shoji doors – no mods or CC

If you find that the Shoji doors from The Sims 4 Snowy Escape just aren't the right size for your build, just use a simple build trick to craft some yourself.

It’s been a while now since The Sims 4 released the brand new Snowy Escape expansion pack. If you already own it, you’ll be well acquainted with the pack’s assets and features by now.

From hiking up Mt. Komorebi (once you figure out how to actually do it) to the beautiful build/buy items that came with the pack, Snowy Escape is the perfect feel-good distraction during a time that is vastly unpleasant.

The world of Mt. Komorebi is based on Japan, something which is very visible in the build/buy items that came with the pack.

Shoji doors in the Sims 4 Snowy Escape

One of the traditional architectural elements that came with the pack is Shoji doors and windows.  A whole lot of them.

On their own, they are gorgeous additions to many builds, but there is just one slight problem. Okay, maybe not a problem so much. A slight bone of contention.

The already open Shoji doors that came with the Sims 4: Snowy Escape expansion pack….well, they just aren’t always the right size.

Luckily, with so many Shoji windows to choose from, there is an easy solution: just build your own. You won’t need any custom content or mods to customise your own Shoji doors in The Sims 4 – only the Snowy Escape pack.

How to customise your own Shoji doors in The Sims 4

You will need to know your way round build cheats in The Sims 4, but other than that, the process is super simple.  This method is only for creating Shoji sliding “doors” that already open.

These are not actually doors at all. Your Sims won’t be opening or closing the ‘doors’, but the walkway will be completely usable. This is useful for creating an open-plan flowing space, without the restrictions of the sliding doors being a certain width apart. 

If you are building with the shortest wall height, you might want to go up a level just to grab the taller Shoji windows. Top tip: If you build a small basement, you can simply set these to the tallest wall heights so that you can easily grab the windows you need.

To create your own custom Shoji doors in The Sims 4 Snowy Escape, start by drawing a wall where you want the ‘doors’ to go. Don’t worry about painting it, it will be removed later. This tutorial also assumes you are familiar with the most common Sims 4 build cheats, like turning moveobjects on.

Now, place your Shoji ‘doors’ (the windows) as far apart as you would like the doors to be. Then, use the spandrel tool to place a spandrel between the two windows. The beam from The Sims 4 Seasons expansion pack looks neat, but other spandrels will work, too. It’s entirely down to personal preference.

For now, you only need to place the spandrel between the two windows – we’ll work with the walls above later. Alternatively, you can also leave the walls intact and bookend them with columns. This is only an option if you are not going to downsize the windows (more on that below).

This is where things can be a bit tricky, because there are some limitations to this method, but nothing a few build tricks can’t fix.

If you are building using platforms and the lowest wall height, there can be some spacing issues underneath the ‘doors’. Using the shortest windows can result in the opposite (spacing issues above the windows). You can see an example of these issues in the screenshots below.

Using the taller Shoji windows as your doors should eliminate most of these problems, but that can also result in clipping on the second floor, if you have one.

You can place the windows on platforms to get around some of these issues as illustrated above. You can then decorate the platforms with plants or water features or anything else you see fit. However, that might not fit your build style.

Another useful workaround is to downsize the windows using the [ key. Don’t worry if you see the windows clipping in the wall, this will be deleted anyway. Move the windows up/down the wall using the 9/0 keys on your keyboard.

Remember, unlike your foolish tutor did in these screenshots, the windows do not need to go all the way to top of the wall since the beam will fill part of the gap.

Once you are happy with the layout, you can either use the spandrel tool to replace the wall, or use the sledgehammer tool to delete the wall behind the window (make sure you highlight just the wall and not the window) and then add the spandrel.

Different methods will give you different results. Any gaps that remain visible can be hidden with some crafty plant placings. Building your own Shoji doors in The Sims 4 this way can be a little bit frustrating at first, but it’s well worth it for those unique looks with larger or much smaller spaces that just don’t fit with what the pack gave us.


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